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Belters and bohemians: Opera Locos @Sadlers_wells

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At the start of the Opera Locos performance, the announcement says that they really are singing. You could be forgiven for wondering that, given the amplification turns up the backing track and the voices so loud that you can't always tell what's real. But this is a mostly harmless and slightly eccentric blend of opera classics fused with the occasional pop classic. However, recognising the pop tunes would help if you were over a certain age. The most recent of them dates back twenty years. It's currently playing at the Peacock Theatre .  Five performers play out a variety of archetype opera characters. There's the worn-out tenor (Jesús Álvarez), the macho baritone (Enrique Sánchez-Ramos), the eccentric counter-tenor (Michaël Kone), the dreamy soprano (María Rey-Joly) and the wild mezzo-soprano (Mayca Teba). Since my singing days, I haven't recognised these types of performers. However, once, I recall a conductor saying he wanted no mezzo-sopranos singing with the s

Christmas in Hull: FCUK’D @BunkertheatreUK

FCUK’D at The Bunker is a an alternative Christmas theatre experience about life on the margins of British life.

A teenage boy kidnaps his little brother and they run away. Escaping their grim council flat, daily run-ins with the authorities and in search of something better than this in the lead up to Christmas.

Estimates put it at around 100,000 children run away from home every year. This piece unpacks some of the reasons why. Dad is gone. Mum is either drinking or comatose. Nobody cares about them and so they’re going to have some fun. They steal crisps from the supermarket. They steal a car. And then they burn it for warmth.

Written and directed by Niall Ransome, the story is told in verse. Ransome took inspiration from his experiences growing up in Hull.



It’s delivered convincingly by Will Mytum as the troubled youth. He engages you through it’s short duration. Pacing about the stage, eyeing the audience, brining to life this tale about never getting a break.

The stage is a square of astroturf that resembles some neglected games area on a council estate. Leaves are piled in corners and a faulty street lamp partially lights the way. The perfect setting for trouble to emerge from the shadows.

Running at under an hour its a compelling alternative Christmas tale about the great British divide. Or

FCUK’D concludes at The Bunker from 27 to 30 December

⭐️⭐️⭐️

Photos by Andrea Lambis

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