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Kafka-ish: Kafka @Finborough

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In offering proof that Kafka is everything to everyone - writer-performer Jack Klaff plays various roles, including the man himself in what is a part tour, part immersion and part legend of Franz Kafka. He is a writer who achieved fame after his life was cut short due to succumbing to tuberculosis at the age of forty. He is probably better known for his reputation and the Kafkaesque style attributed to his writing than his life. But after this piece, you’re left curious to learn more about the man and his works. And that has to be the best theatrical tribute you could give a writer, even for a writer who stipulated that his works be destroyed upon his death. It’s currently playing at the Finborough Theatre . Franz Kafka was born in Prague in 1883. In 1901, he was admitted to a university and began studying law. While studying, he met Max Brod, who would become his best friend and eventual literary executor. Brod would posthumously publish many of his works and writings. Kafka’s life co

The man with the banana: Flinch @ORLTheatre

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Flinch is a play about gender roles. But it’s also a timely reminder that you date actor-writers at your own peril. As you never know if you’re going to be the material for their next piece. Emma Hemingford writes and co-stars in this piece about modern relationships which is having its debut at the Old Red Lion Theatre . She plays Jess, an actor of sorts struggling with auditions and lecherous directors. Mark (Joseph Reed) works in the city as a trader. Just as they move in together into his Bethnal Green flat, an incident happens. A violent mugger appears and threatens them both. Mark flinches (or according to Jess screams and runs away, leaving her alone). It turns out it was a bit of a joke since the mugger was brandishing a banana (and wearing a pretty camp t-shirt). But this sets in motion a series of innocent conversations that lead into darker territory about the disappointments they have with each other.  The piece works at it’s best during these conversations. And i