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Kafka-ish: Kafka @Finborough

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In offering proof that Kafka is everything to everyone - writer-performer Jack Klaff plays various roles, including the man himself in what is a part tour, part immersion and part legend of Franz Kafka. He is a writer who achieved fame after his life was cut short due to succumbing to tuberculosis at the age of forty. He is probably better known for his reputation and the Kafkaesque style attributed to his writing than his life. But after this piece, you’re left curious to learn more about the man and his works. And that has to be the best theatrical tribute you could give a writer, even for a writer who stipulated that his works be destroyed upon his death. It’s currently playing at the Finborough Theatre . Franz Kafka was born in Prague in 1883. In 1901, he was admitted to a university and began studying law. While studying, he met Max Brod, who would become his best friend and eventual literary executor. Brod would posthumously publish many of his works and writings. Kafka’s life co

Two women in a boat: previewing The Gulf @TristanBates

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Currently running at Tristan Bates Theatre is the European Premiere of The Gulf by Audrey Cefaly. An exploration of the challenges facing all relationships. Including LGBTQ+ ones... Stranded on a boat together on a fishing trip in Alabama, two women are forced to confront their differences. Louisa Lytton and Anna Acton feature. The Gulf made its world premiere as a short play in August 2010. It’s now been developed into a longer piece that premiered in 2016. It received the 2016 Edgerton Foundation New American Play award and was nominated for The Charles McArthur Award for Outstanding new Play.  Directed by Matthew Gould, The Gulf continues until 5 May at Tristan Bates Theatre.

I'm Getting My Act Together and Taking It On the Road @JsTheatre

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  Time heals everything they say. It has been over thirty years since London has seen I'm Getting My Act Together and Taking It On the Road. And watching it at the  Jermyn Street Theatre  is like a trip back in time. When you arrive there is a band getting ready for the show, and you could be forgiven for thinking you were in a cabaret spot from the 1970s. Complete with pantsuits, glitter makeup and records on the wall. It is a terrific looking production that makes you feel like walking down the steps to the theatre you have been in a time machine.  But with its handful of songs and themes about the role of women, it almost feels as it time has stood still. The dialogue may be firmly rooted in the 1970s (and often a bit predictable), but the themes of female empowerment and being independent seem as if we haven't come so far since..