Featured Post

Eternal guilt: Dorian The Musical @SWKplay

Image
Dorian is a new musical that updates Oscar Wilde’s gothic novel from the uptight Victorian era to an undetermined period of gender fluidity and glam rock. On paper, musicalising the Picture of Dorian Gray to a period of glam rock, social media, and cheap shoes seems like a good idea. After all, Oscar Wilde’s gothic story is very adaptable. It has been the source of countless adaptations for the stage, television or movies. I was half expecting a trashy Dorian, similar to the early 1980s telemovie that shifted Dorian’s gender to a woman. This version falls into a so bad it’s good category with Anthony Perkins in a lead role, who as he ages under makeup starts to look like Andy Warhol.  And while it’s great to see a new show, a strong cast can’t compensate for such an earnest production with underpowered songs. There’s no sense of fun, and some curious staging and costume choices  -mismatched dresses, crocodile boots and furry suits - serve as a distraction. It’s currently playing at th

Lonely Town: The Lonely Londoners @JSTheatre


Sam Selvon’s novel about the Windrush generation comes to vivid life in this flashy adaptation by Roy Williams—the hustle and the struggle contrast with the exuberant joy and acclamation of life in the city. Lights flash, feet dance, and pigeons get strangled...  for food. It’s an hour and forty-five minutes that doesn’t let up, and it is currently playing at the Jermyn Street Theatre

Set in 1956 London, we meet Henry “Sir Galahad” Oliver (Romario Simpson). He is in a hurry to start a new life in London and seeks out Moses Aloetta (Gamba Cole) to help him get started. Only to find that Moses and his friends have become disillusioned with city life and don’t share his enthusiasm. The fights, the petty discrimination, and the lack of job offers make it an endless struggle. And it’s fascinating to see the transformation of Simpson as he gets worn down by the endless setbacks. 


It’s a simple yet stylish production, with the cast remaining onstage with a black wall. Elliot Griggs’ lighting serves to give the vibrancy of the city, underscore the drama and spell out the various postcodes as they move about London.

The simple staging allows the focus to be on the finely drawn characters. The ensemble brings them to life and makes them storytellers, witnesses to injustice, and celebrators of the rich life of living in London.

Events move at a clip, and while violence and discrimination are always nearby, there is also humour and warmth that comes through as the men bond and create their sense of family and place. By the time the piece ends, the discussion about leaving London is brief. After all, despite the odds, they have made a life here and created something out of nothing. 

Directed by Ebenezer Bamgboye, The Lonely Londoners is at the Jermyn Street Theatre until 5 March.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️



Photos by Alex Brenner

Popular posts from this blog

Opera and full frontal nudity: Rigoletto

Fantasies: Afterglow @Swkplay

Play ball: Damn Yankees @LandorTheatre